pastor

How an introvert can be a leader and pastor...

Photo Credit: Vo Minh Thong via Unsplash  

I really love people.

I do.

It's just I'd rather be alone. Not always, but some of the time, not even most of the time—just some.

I know. Some people will wonder, and I have been asked, "How can I be a pastor and an introvert."

I've asked myself this question. Ministry is about people. It's relational and intimate. It requires me to be around people and to invest in them one on one and communally.

Some people think the best lead pastors are extroverted and too the extreme degree.

I don't know. Maybe, but maybe not. I think it takes a plurality of leaders and personality types to lead and shepherd the church.

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I think many of us are realizing the formula we think it takes to lead a healthy church, notice I didn't say successful church, is not necessarily the best for what God has designed for His church.

This blog post isn't about what personality type makes a better lead pastor or even about the best formula—it's really about how me, being an introvert and pastor, can be the leader and pastor God has called me to be.

For me, I need some alone time and I need some people time.

I need people time so I can be filled with love and encouragement. This comes with being around people. And I also need to be the one who does the filling as well.

I also need quiet and alone time.

It is very beneficial for me to have moments where I can decompress and meditate on the conversations and interactions I've had with people.

For me to be a whole person, I need both spaces and environments. It's not an either/or, it's a both/and. If you were to ask me which I prefer, I'd tell you it depends on the day and circumstance. Although I do prefer more alone time than I do people time.

 

The thing is I need both. And I desire both.

And this realization is freeing. It has allowed me to be who I am as a leader and pastor—when this happens it creates a healthy environment for the church I lead and pastor.

 

http://youtu.be/rUaj7rj6MI8

RSA Shorts – The Power of Quiet

Great video on extroverts, introverts, leadership, teamwork, and collaboration.

Just let it soak in...

This week I am at a Pastors/Ministry Spring Conference at a small Bible College in Boise, ID.

Aside from missing my family and Central Oregon, I am having a great time hanging out with a couple of my best friends, gathering some fresh and important insight for ministry.

I've also learned how to play Disc golf—I have no idea why I didn't play this before...

 

Yesterday I sat through a workshop taught by one of my former coworkers during our days at an amazing church in Longmont, CO.

I heard this quote at the workshop that I want to share with you:

 

"We will not be effective in influencing our culture, if we are focused on ourselves." - Derek Voorhees

 

Now I understand most of you will want to look more deeply into the "influencing culture" and dissect it, but my contention is not so much the influencing culture part of the quote, but our focus should be on "focused on ourselves."

Many of you won't disagree with me saying the biggest hinderance to the gospel is selfishness.

But maybe you won't like this—many of us design, craft, and operate our churches to cater to selfishness. Not just for the people who attend our churches, but probably mostly for our own selfish desires.

Don't react.

Just let my statement soak in and think about it...

Then repent.

I did.

 

Joe

*If your interested in learning about flattening the church and moving the church toward the art of neighboring, I suggest you take a look at LifeBridge Christian Church in Longmont, CO.

 

 

Introvert living in an extrovert world...

About two years ago I discovered something about myself that I should've known all along because I demonstrated these strong tendencies as a kid—I'm an introvert at the very core of who I am, although I do have some extrovert tendencies. To be frank (No. I'm not trying to give myself a new persona), I don't really like to admit this about myself. In what I do—I'm a pastor, it is assumed that I am an extrovert and it is assumed the best people for what I do are extroverts.

Which both of these assumptions—I am finding are not true.

For most of my life I was coerced or lead to believe that I was an extrovert or that being an extrovert was necessary for me to be a leader and to achieve some level of success. This caused me to suppress my introvertness and tricked me to lose my identity of who I really am as a person—especially a healthy me.

My guess is that many of you find or have found yourselves in this situation.

Over the next two weeks I will dedicate a blog post to this topic and to my journey of discovering the freedom to be who I am.

But for now, I encourage you to read a blog post by Justin Lathrop: "I'm An Introvert and A Pastor—Help!

I think there are a lot of misconceptions about introverts in ministry. I don’t think it’s impossible to be an introvert and also a really good pastor. In fact, I believe we need introverts. Not only are they good thinkers, but they are really good connectors too. While extroverts can seem to be the most exciting person at a party, sometimes introverts have an ability to connect with a person one-on-one that an extrovert lacks. - Justin Lathrop ("I'm An Introvert and A Pastor—!")

Joe

The importance of a discipleship legacy

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"We are proud of you. You have set off on a wonderful adventure. Who knows what God will do in transforming your lives?" - Wayne and Rolly Bigalow

Fina found a letter from Wayne and Rolly Bigalow, spiritual giants and ministry mentors in our lives, dated August 31st, 2001.

This letter was written to encouraging our family before we left for our wonderful adventure moving from California to Missouri to attend Ozark Christian College and to do ministry.

And it's very fitting for us on our new wonderful adventure here in Oregon.

the beginning...

Wayne is the reason why I am in ministry today! He was the Senior Minister of Sonrise Christian Church in Windsor, CA, and I served as the youth minister at Sonrise.

Wayne was the person who encouraged us to take a step of faith and follow God's call on our lives. So with my wife and three kids we packed up everything we owned and moved to Missouri to finish my Bible college education.

I am forever grateful for Wayne and Rolly (She went to be with Jesus years ago) for the impact they had on us, a young ministry family... And Wayne still has an impact on me and my ministry today—he called me last night to see how we are doing in our new ministry.

the importance of a discipleship legacy...

Wayne and Rolly believed in us and taught us to trusted God and to rely on His grace to get is through our new adventure. We also learned from them the importance of discipleship—leading others into becoming more like Jesus. To invest in others and have others invest in your life is one of the keys to lasting relationship with Jesus, one that is healthy, vibrant, and reproducing.

We have been so fortunate to have so many people mentor us and allow us the freedom to fail and succeed in ministry. As a result of others investing in us, we have been able to do the same. I think many times we have been the ones being blessed by us investing in others, and not so much the other way around.

It is important to carry-on legacy of discipleship. It is not only beneficial for the person your are investing in, but it is also beneficial for you—if you don't then your faith can become self-centered and eventually it shrivels up and dies.

Who are you creating a discipleship legacy with?

Joe

The importance of a discipleship legacy

20140212-193353.jpg

"We are proud of you. You have set off on a wonderful adventure. Who knows what God will do in transforming your lives?" - Wayne and Rolly Bigalow

Fina found a letter from Wayne and Rolly Bigalow, spiritual giants and ministry mentors in our lives, dated August 31st, 2001.

This letter was written to encouraging our family before we left for our wonderful adventure moving from California to Missouri to attend Ozark Christian College and to do ministry.

And it's very fitting for us on our new wonderful adventure here in Oregon.

the beginning...

Wayne is the reason why I am in ministry today! He was the Senior Minister of Sonrise Christian Church in Windsor, CA, and I served as the youth minister at Sonrise.

Wayne was the person who encouraged us to take a step of faith and follow God's call on our lives. So with my wife and three kids we packed up everything we owned and moved to Missouri to finish my Bible college education.

I am forever grateful for Wayne and Rolly (She went to be with Jesus years ago) for the impact they had on us, a young ministry family... And Wayne still has an impact on me and my ministry today—he called me last night to see how we are doing in our new ministry.

the importance of a discipleship legacy...

Wayne and Rolly believed in us and taught us to trusted God and to rely on His grace to get is through our new adventure. We also learned from them the importance of discipleship—leading others into becoming more like Jesus. To invest in others and have others invest in your life is one of the keys to lasting relationship with Jesus, one that is healthy, vibrant, and reproducing.

We have been so fortunate to have so many people mentor us and allow us the freedom to fail and succeed in ministry. As a result of others investing in us, we have been able to do the same. I think many times we have been the ones being blessed by us investing in others, and not so much the other way around.

It is important to carry-on legacy of discipleship. It is not only beneficial for the person your are investing in, but it is also beneficial for you—if you don't then your faith can become self-centered and eventually it shrivels up and dies.

Who are you creating a discipleship legacy with?

Joe

Online support for the Puentes family and Ascent Christian Church...

As many of you know Fina and I have left our ministry at LifeBridge Christian Church in Longmont, CO, and are moving to Prineville, OR. We are taking on a new ministry at Ascent Christian Church—in partnership with the OCEF, as the lead pastor of the church, beginning in January 2014. Ascent Christian Church is a church plant in Central Oregon. It was planted by OCEF (Oregon Christian Evangelistic Fellowship: http://www.ocefchurchplanters.com/) about five years ago, but ran into some difficult times and is going through some changes.

You may also be aware of the fact that Fina and I will have to raise a portion of our salary. Our commitment to the church is to raise support for two years (That’s $1800 a month for two years—a total of $43,200).

To help us meet this goal, a very good friend who is savvy in the website making business (She does it professionally), donated her time and constructed a website for Ascent Christian Church...

The church website is still being developed. However, online giving is available: http://www.ascentcc.com/giving/  (Be sure to check the box - I would like to designate this donation to a specific fund AND select: "Help Pastor Joe Puentes & Family").

So if online giving is preferred by you, we have that capability.

We appreciate you partnering with Jesus, by investing financially and prayerfully in the Puentes family and Ascent Christian Church!

OR

I you still prefer to mail your financial contribution—you can do so by following the instructions below...

You can send financial contributions to: Ascent Christian Church P O Box 2117 Prineville, OR 97754 Make the check payable to Ascent Christian Church... Please indicate on the check memo line “Puentes Missions” so we can apply it to the correct account. (Your contribution is a tax deductible donation).

A couple of things to consider...

ways to give

  • Through the mail via check
  • Through online giving set up through your bank
  • Through the church's website

if you donate via paypal (Through the church's website)

Please consider increasing your donation amount slightly, as Paypal takes a small percentage as a fee for their services.